See Georgie Henley in “The Spanish Princess”

Here is a new clip of Georgie Henley (still most famous for her portrayal of Lucy Pevensie in Walden’s Narnia movies) playing another royal character on the Starz show The Spanish Princess.

Georgie Henley as Meg Tudor

Henley is now the same age as Queen Lucy at the end of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (23).

Another fun Narnia fact: Henley is playing Meg Tudor, a historical figure who was a member of the Tudor family after the War of the Roses, a war Lucy references in the Prince Caspian book when Trumpkin is initially trying to explain Caspian’s story.

“I see,” said Peter. “And Caspian is the chief Old Narnian.”

“Well, in a manner of speaking,” said the Dwarf, scratching his head. “But he’s really a New Narnian, a Telmarine, if you follow me.”

“I don’t,” said Edmund.

“It’s worse than the Wars of the Roses,” said Lucy.

Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia, Ch. 3

The Spanish Princess airs on Starz on Sundays at 8pm EDT.

12 Responses

  1. Glumpuddle says:

    C'mon Georgie, convince the producers to make a 3-minute short film on the side called "Queen Lucy the Valiant" that takes place in the golden age, using a set and costume from The Spanish Princess. Just a short dialogue scene in character as Lucy, that’s all I ask.

  2. Jonathan Paravel says:

    The last view of her we get looks similar to the Christian singer Rebecca St James :). All grown up.
    I am glad she has a stable acting career with this, and Game of Thrones prequel soon.

  3. icarus says:

    Very much looking forward to this! Both the White Queen and The White Princess were excellent, so hopefully they can keep the good run of form going!

  4. Cleander says:

    Wait, Catherine of Aragon is in this? That's cool!
    In that picture Georgie looks SO MUCH like she does on VDT (even the same pose with the bow and arrow)

    • coracle says:

      Yes, it’s about Catherine – she is the Spanish princess of the series title. The book is called The Constant Princess, but I assume this title is easier for people to connect with.

  5. JFG II says:

    Forgive me for already saying this countless times –

    Georgie & the sibs would have worked in an adaptation of HHB, if the movie had been made late this decade.

    However, even if Georgie wanted a cameo, Skander probably wouldn’t, and his role is an active role full of planning & sword fighting against Arab-looking people.

    Given Skander studied Arabic before dropping acting for parliament, I don’t think he’d want to be a part of something that has even a hint of backwardness, or whatever these people call it these days.

    • coracle says:

      Not Arab-looking, but Indian-looking.
      You may not be aware, but for at least 15 years Mr Gresham has been explaining that the Calormenes are NOT Arabic, but more like Northern Indians, the old Moghul empire prior to British colonisation.
      No studio in its right mind would make a film using Arabic-looking people and costumes for Calormenes, and nor would the Estate.

  6. wild rose says:

    Wow, Lucy all grown up. I'm glad her acting career seems to be pretty stable. I'd have really loved to see her in HHB, but oh well.

  7. HermitoftheNorthernMarch says:

    Nice picture! I hope she has fun playing the character.

    I don't have cable.

  8. Glumpuddle says:

    It’s really cool to see Georgie acting in this genre. Should generate great footage for HHB fan trailers. 😉

    But I’ll be honest: I just want to have the honor of being the first person to post a comment on the new NarniaWeb. 🙂

  9. Christopher says:

    Georgie Henley looks old enough to reprise her role as Queen Lucy in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Horse and His Boy. I wish Andrew Adamson would return to direct it. He skipped Narnia 1 and 3 to do Narnia 2 and 4, so to keep the continuity, Andrew really, really, REALLY needs to return and finish what he started for the audience – if only for movies 1 and 3. I still think this decade-long-Narnia-film-holdup-fiasco has to be one of the biggest disgraces in the history of cinema.

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