In Other News

The Mark Gordon Company to Adapt “Come From Away”

Posted November 18, 2017 3:33 pm by daughter of the king 1 Comment

Come From Away is the Tony award-winning musical about the travelers stranded in Gander, New Foundland, after the 9/11 attacks. According to, The Mark Gordon Company (producer for The Silver Chair) is adapting the musical into a feature film with the script written by the authors of the play, Irene Sankoff and David Hein. The article also included a quote from Mark Gordon:

“Irene, David and Christopher created an experience that celebrates the triumph of humankind’s solidarity and compassion in the face of adversity – an experience that is equally breathtaking, inspiring and cathartic. We are proud to create a feature film adaptation to share with audiences around the world,” said Mark Gordon in a statement.

Thanks to Pat for notifying us!

The Mark Gordon Company Releases “Murder on the Orient Express”

Posted November 10, 2017 12:57 pm by daughter of the king 2 Comments

The latest film from The Mark Gordon Company, the production company behind The Silver Chair, is an adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express. Reviews are so far somewhat mixed, but it currently has a 61% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Does this bode well for future book adaptations from The Mark Gordon Company?

The film also has other ties to Narnia. Kenneth Branagh, who directed the film and starred as the famous detective Hercule Poirot, was the narrator for an audiobook of The Magician’s Nephew. And Derek Jacobi, who plays Edward Henry Masterman, narrated an audiobook of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Today is #NarniaDay

Posted October 16, 2017 3:30 am by Glumpuddle 13 Comments

Fans around the world are using the hashtag #NarniaDay on social media, 67 years after the publication of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (October 16, 1950).

“‘The Lion all began with a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrella and parcels in a snowy wood. This picture had been in my mind since I was about sixteen. Then one day, when I was about forty, I said to myself: ‘Let’s try to make a story about it.’”
– C.S. Lewis

How did you first discover Narnia and what does it mean to you? Share your story on social media or post a comment below.

Narnia Movie Props up for Auction

Posted September 19, 2017 12:43 pm by daughter of the king 15 Comments

Movie props periodically get auctioned off. Currently, three Narnia props are available for bidding at The items include Peter’s sword and scabbard from Prince Caspian, Peter’s night raid costume from Prince Caspian, and a Tavros animatronic head from The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Close-up of Peter’s sword

Thanks to Eric Novak for the heads up!

Follow the Signs – New NarniaWeb Shirts Are Here!

Posted September 2, 2017 7:08 am by Glumpuddle 12 Comments

Filming has not yet begun on The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair, but we are already hyped. Display your Narnia pride and fill your wardrobe with these new shirts and hoodies!

We will begin shipping in October. Place your order soon if you want to be in the first batch.

Whatever strange things may happen to you, let nothing turn your mind from following the signs.
– Aslan


Watch Out for These Fake C.S. Lewis Quotes

Posted August 11, 2017 2:03 pm by Glumpuddle 4 Comments

Unfortunately, C.S. Lewis seems to be one of the world’s most misquoted authors, at least on social media. For the past few years, William O’Flaherty from has been documenting false Lewis quotes, researching their actual origin, and setting the record straight. NarniaWeb supports the effort to prevent these errors from spreading further.

If you are ever doubtful about the authenticity of a quote attributed to C.S. Lewis, post it on the Confirming C.S. Lewis Quotes Facebook page.

Here are some examples:

  • “You don’t have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.”
    Actual source: George MacDonald (paraphrase)
  • “Be weird. Be random. Be who you are. Because you never know who would love the person you hide.”
    Actual source: Unknown
  • “You are never too old to set another goal or dream a new dream.”
    Actual source: Les Brown
  • “Children are not a distraction from more important work. They are the most important work.”
    Actual source: Dr. John Trainer

View more reported false quotes here.

And, check out the new series about William’s research on the All About Jack podcast.

See Will Poulter in ‘Detroit’

Posted August 4, 2017 9:30 am by daughter of the king 6 Comments

As Narnia fans continue to wait for more Silver Chair news, previous cast members are involved in many other projects.

Ben Barnes will be appearing in “Marvel’s The Punisher” on Netflix. No release date for the series has been announced, but Barnes recently discussed his role in an interview.

Will Poulter stars in ‘Detroit’, a docudrama about the 1967 riots in Detroit, Michigan. The film opens world-wide August 4.

Watch an interview with Poulter here:

And view the trailer here:


Georgie Henley stars in “Access All Areas”, a comedy about a gang of teenagers at a music festival.

C.S. Lewis Coming to Broadway in October

Posted August 3, 2017 2:32 pm by The Rose-Tree Dryad

This autumn in New York City, the Fellowship for Performing Arts will be reviving William Nicholson’s Tony-nominated and Olivier Award-winning play Shadowlands. Directed by Broadway veteran Christa Scott-Reed and set to premiere this October, the play tells the love story of C.S. Lewis and Joy Davidman:

In its first New York revival, William Nicholson’s award-winning play Shadowlands follows the unlikely and true love story of renowned Oxford scholar and Christian apologist C.S. Lewis and the much younger Joy Davidman, a Jewish-American writer, former Communist and Christian convert. The smart, brash Joy bursts into Lewis’ sedate, middle-aged life and upends it. Lewis is as shocked as anyone to discover that he and Joy have fallen deeply in love – and then almost immediately he must contend with the equally deep pain of losing her when she is diagnosed with terminal cancer. Full of great humor and keen insight, the play is a moving portrait of love and loss, faith and doubt, as inspired by Lewis’ own A Grief Observed.

Nicholson’s Shadowlands is best known for its 1993 film adaptation starring Anthony Hopkins. The upcoming Fellowship of Performing Arts stage production follows Max McLean’s portrayal of Lewis in A Most Reluctant Convert. (See NarniaWeb’s review for the gripping one-man play here.)

“It’s outstanding timing that FPA audiences will see Shadowlands so soon after seeing Max’s wonderful show The Most Reluctant Convert,” says Director Christa Scott-Reed. “On so many levels, Shadowlands is the natural next step for an audience member who is learning more about C.S. Lewis’s journey of faith. In The Most Reluctant Convert, we see Lewis slowly, and, yes, reluctantly, opening himself up to God and then Christianity. In Shadowlands, we see him slowly and as reluctantly opening himself up to love and then marriage. In The Most Reluctant Convert, we see him find his faith. In Shadowlands, we see him at risk of losing it.”

Shadowlands premieres on October 17th and is scheduled to run until January 7th. Tickets on sale soon. For more information, check out The Fellowship for Performing Arts’ website.

Thanks to ‘Just Queen, not High Queen’ for the alert.

NarniaWeb Reviews “The Most Reluctant Convert”

Posted July 18, 2017 1:27 pm by daughter of the king 2 Comments

In C.S. Lewis on Stage: The Most Reluctant Convert, Max McLean (writer, performer, co-director) takes the audience on a journey through C.S. Lewis’ early life and his dramatic conversion story. While at times the play can feel a bit heavy, it never turns into a lecture but remains an intense drama about one man’s inner conflict. View the trailer and purchase tickets here.

The play opens with a commentary on pain and “when I was an atheist,” and ends with wonder and the absolute certainty “now I believe,” In between, fans of Lewis’ work will probably recognize many passages as McLean drew on various letters, books, and essays to create an almost seamless tale.

The set is simple, mostly static, and relies on McLean’s admirable performance to fill the stage. The focal points are photographs projected onto the back wall and a comfortable armchair. The photographs showcase various people and authors who influenced Lewis as well as important locations, such as the trenches in WWI, the exterior of Magdalen College, and Addison’s Walk, a place where he had a life-changing conversation with J.R.R. Tolkien. The armchair is where Lewis sometimes relaxes like he is having a companionable chat with the audience, and the lighting is warm and fills the stage. Other times he seems trapped in one place as he describes the absolute presence of a supreme being and the fear that his mind is not alone, and the lighting is cold and focused in a way that feels almost claustrophobic.

Although there is no intermission, the play is neatly divided into chapters with brief pauses in between. Most of these sections are spent describing the various teachers and authority figures in Lewis’ life and how they influenced his experience with faith and religion. Some parts are quite humorous, such as the description of his tutor, and when he became friends with Hugo Dyson and Tolkien and frustratingly realized he was surrounding himself with Christians. Other parts are sadder, such as his mother dying of cancer, and the horrors of WWI and realizing his own mortality.

The parts that seemed to resonate most with the audience were the ones where he talks about a deep longing and a search for joy. There are books all over the stage that Lewis interacts with as he talks about how various works influenced him, but one of the most gripping descriptions is the first time he read Phantastes by George MacDonald. The experience “baptized” his imagination, and was “the essential story of my life, the search for an unsatisfied desire, a desire more desirable than any other satisfaction.” Later, he talks about how joy is more than just happiness, and how he found in himself “a desire which no experience in this world could satisfy.”

Even with such moments of intense emotion, the audience is given room to breathe. Some moments are intentionally comedic, like when he says many people think he is a Puritan and then immediately takes a drink from his liquor cabinet. At other moments the audience laughs not because the subject matter is particularly funny, but because the story is sometimes delivered with an almost embarrassed demeanor that holds true to the concept of Lewis being “the most dejected, reluctant convert in all England.”

At first glance, the subject matter seems like it would appeal to only a specific audience, but the play manages to avoid preaching. McLean said in a discussion with the audience afterward that he was “interested in how this piece lands with those of a different worldview.”

Convert ends before Lewis begins writing the Narnia books or meets Joy Davidman, but the Fellowship for Performing Arts will be performing a version of Shadowlands, the love story of Lewis and Davidman, this fall in New York City.

Vote For Your Favorite Chronicle of Narnia

Posted July 8, 2017 8:31 am by Glumpuddle 23 Comments

Every so often, we like to poll NarniaWebbers about the most basic question: Which of the seven Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis is your favorite?

To vote, go to the homepage. The “Opinion Poll” is in the upper-right corner.

If you are like many readers, the answer to this question can change over time (even day to day). But at this moment, which book would you give the top spot?

Post a comment below to explain your vote.